Library Resources

Library Resources

In Memory of Eva Kor

In Memory of Eva Kor

Eva Mozes Kor, a Jewish activist and educator who suffered in the Holocaust, passed away earlier this month.  She died while leading an educational field trip, only a few miles from the notorious Auschwitz concentration camp where she lost almost all of her family – dedicated to the very last to educate as many people as possible so that no one else might suffer what she did. Eva Kor visited IU East and shared her story with us recently, describing the horrors of losing her family to the Nazi regime and suffering torture masquerading as ‘medical experiments’ at the hands of Dr. Josef Mengele, since she was a twin.  Despite suffering and losing more in a single year than most … Continued
Children’s Reading

Children’s Reading

With summer reading programs at many nearby public libraries in full swing (for example, those at Morrisson Reeves, Centerville, and New Castle), parents are on the lookout for lots of quality books for their children to read.  Many local reading programs have a space exploration theme this year, and our library holds many relevant titles, in addition to any other topic of interest to a young reader. The main purpose of the IU East Library’s expansive juvenile collection is instructional – it supports education, child development, and psychology majors in learning how to teach and understand children.  But this focus, different from a public library’s emphasis on the most popular material, makes it a treasure trove of unique books that … Continued
The magic of abracadabra

The magic of abracadabra

We’ve all seen it –  a magician in a top hat waves his wand and says the magic word Abracadabra.  Poof!  A rabbit appears!  A watch is restored to perfect condition after being smashed to bits!  The woman who was sawed in two is now whole again!  Wonders are associated with this word, but what does it really mean? Abracadabra began its life as a healing spell.  It’s been traced as far back as the third century CE, when physician Quintus Serenus Sammonicus (better known as Serenus) wrote the treatise Liber Medicinalis.  This book documented, in Latin verse, numerous cures for common ailments, including the proper use of Abracadabra. The proper use of abracadabra as a healing spell. First, a … Continued
The Persistence of Memory

The Persistence of Memory

“Do you want to take a picture?” “Oh, I’m sure we’ll remember it.” Have you ever heard an exchange like that?  We have a tendency to take memory for granted; to assume that what we want of our past will be accessible later on.  That is true whether the memories are personal – the first words of a new baby, perhaps – or societal, such as memory of a major cultural shift or shared triumph or tragedy.  Memories (whether personal or recounted for us in books, museums, and memorials) preserve learning and heritage and culture.  Lives are defined by it.  Even blockbuster popular entertainment like the television show Game of Thrones have recently paused the action long enough to contemplate … Continued
Archives Update: New Projects, New Faces

Archives Update: New Projects, New Faces

To celebrate the IU Bicentennial we wanted to share some exciting updates about both on-going and new IU East Archives projects! Media Collections Online First, all the audio-visual material that was housed in the archives and sent to Bloomington for the Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative (MDPI Project) are now back and they have been digitized. We are working on moving them into IU’s Media Collection Online (MCO), which is the campus wide platform for all of IU’s digitized AV material. We are building collections and pushing them from Dark Avalon, which is a read-only, restricted access site to MCO. If you know we have something in the archives, such as a Starr Gennett recording or an oral history interview … Continued