Library Resources

Library Resources

Sing, O Muse

Sing, O Muse

April is National Poetry Month.  Launched in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, it pays tribute to the ways poetry enriches American culture, both past and present.  Their website has a number of poetry-related readings and activities, including a Poem-A-Day program you can receive through email.  You can also follow Natasha Trethewey, our current Poet Laureate, at the Library of Congress.  But our library is well stocked with resources for poetry and poetry criticism, as well.  Among are databases are Litfinder, which includes over 150,000 full-text poems and 800,000+ poetry citations, among numerous other short stories, speeches, and plays; 20th Century American Poetry, which includes over 50,000 poems from authors like Adrienne Rich, Langston Hughes, Ezra Pound, Denise Levertov, … Continued
World Health Day

World Health Day

World Health Day, celebrated every April, is the World Health Organization’s holiday designed to raise global health awareness.  Each year, the WHO chooses an aspect of healthy living that they want to use the holiday to promote, and have used the opportunity to showcase topics ranging from road safety to safe motherhood to mental health.  In 2013, the topic is ‘Control Your Blood Pressure’.   High blood pressure can be the cause behind many problems, especially heart disease and strokes.  The WHO views preventive education as the best tool to use against hypertension.  And a library is a terrific place to go for education!  IU East subscribes to many medical databases, such as MedLine, Nursing and Allied Health Source, and OVID.  … Continued
So, If I Can’t Use Wikipedia, What Do I Use?

So, If I Can’t Use Wikipedia, What Do I Use?

You’ve heard it before – you can’t use Wikipedia for this assignment.  This actually isn’t new – long before Wikipedia was invented, students in past generations were often banned from citing any encyclopedia for some assignments, because professors want students to use more in-depth sources.  But let’s say you really need a comprehensive encyclopedia for your work.  Where do you go?  One great source is the Encyclopedia Britannica Online Academic Edition.  Like the print version, the Britannica is written by a large staff of trained professionals and editors, assuring high-quality coverage of any topic of human thought.  This large staff also means that current events articles are updated within two weeks of the event, so it’s a good source for … Continued
Women’s History

Women’s History

March is Women’s History Month, and a good time to reflect, not just on pioneering women who have changed the world, from Boudica or Hatshepsut to Hillary Clinton or Condoleezza Rice, but those who have changed our own lives, in big and small ways.  Of course, the library stands ready to help you with your research needs.  But we’d like to highlight several resources of particular interest to the study of women’s history. American Women’s History Online highlights significant people, events, legislation, and issues relevant to the study of women’s history in the United States.  It includes biographies, hot topics, primary sources, and multimedia like videos, pictures, maps, and charts. Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 offers … Continued
Social Workers Unite

Social Workers Unite

March is national Social Work Month, and a great time to recognize the work of all those who are and who are studying to become social workers.  From its origins in combating poverty to the modern effort towards equality and justice, social work has been a source of hope to millions.  First celebrated in 1964, this year’s theme is ‘Weaving Threads of Resilience and Advocacy’.  One of the core resources in the field is the Encyclopedia of Social Work, a reference now in its 20th edition.  You can use the print volume in the library – it’s shelved at HV35 .S6 – but it’s also available online, as well.  The current edition takes into account emerging topics like the rise … Continued