african american history

african american history

The 1619 Project and the legacy of slavery

The 1619 Project and the legacy of slavery

In August 1619, the White Lion, an English privateer ship, landed in Point Comfort, a small settlement in the new colony of Virginia.  According to John Rolfe, a Jamestown colonist, the cargo was unique in the history of North America.  “20. and odd Negroes” from Angola were sold for food by the privateers “at the best and easyest rate they could.”  This event is the official beginning of slavery in what would eventually be the United States (although it should be noted that slaves were present in North America before then.)  The New York Times has created the 1619 Project, a set of free resources covering the legacy of slavery, including essays, statistics, maps and creative writing. A map of … Continued
Archives Unbound: Black Economic Empowerment, Civil Rights, Black Liberation, and the FBI

Archives Unbound: Black Economic Empowerment, Civil Rights, Black Liberation, and the FBI

The IU East Campus Library has added several new online archival collections from Archives Unbound that focus on Black history and civil rights. We celebrate and honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. each January and commemorate Black History in February, but any time is a good time to remember and reflect on the many people and groups who participated in the fight for civil rights. These archival collections provide papers, FBI reports, manifestos, and images from a variety of research institutions and government agencies. Black Economic Empowerment: The National Negro Business League Date Range: 1901-1928 Content: 15,779 images Source Library: Library of Congress The National Negro Business League was a business organization founded in Boston, Massachusetts in 1900 by Booker … Continued
Spotlight on History: Frederick Douglass

Spotlight on History: Frederick Douglass

Born with the name Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey in 1818, the man the world knows today as Frederick Douglass left an indelible mark on American history.  From his bestselling first book, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, first published in 1845, to his groundbreaking work on both African-American equality and women’s rights to his career as minister to Haiti, Douglass is a figure whose time is immortal and whose words continue to carry deep and important meaning today. Douglass was born into slavery in Maryland.  He barely knew his mother, who was separated from him in early childhood and died when he was nine.  The identity of his father, who was white, remained a complete mystery … Continued