reference databases

reference databases

Credo Reference Concept Map Poetry Contest! Money! YOU win AND the Library wins!

Credo Reference Concept Map Poetry Contest! Money! YOU win AND the Library wins!

You might be thinking, what’s “Credo reference,” what’s a “concept map,” and most important, “how do I win?” Credo Reference is a service the library subscribes to so IU East  students and faculty have access to full-text articles, images, video and audio clips. It even helps you find books in the IU library catalog (IUCat) and suggests search terms for your topics. You can access Credo Reference from anywhere using your iu user id and password via the proxy server: https://proxy.library.iue.edu/login?url=http://www.credoreference.com More reliable than Google or Wikipedia, Credo Reference is easy to navigate and you can save or email your search content. It also has useful tools, including pronunciations and a crossword puzzle solver! A unique feature of Credo Reference … Continued
New Databases

New Databases

The library has 3 new databases!  You now can search these influential British newspapers: Picture Post Historical Archive, the Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive, and the Illustrated London News Historical Archive.   The Illustrated London News covers its full run, from its founding in 1842 to when it ceased publication in 2003.  The ILN was the first weekly newspaper to feature pictures in every edition (drawings at first, but gradually replaced with photographs around the turn of the century).  The magazine had a strong conservative bent, as most newspapers of the time took strong partisan positions.  At its height, the ILN sold hundreds of thousands of copies of each weekly issue. The Picture Post is the shortest archive, covering the newspaper’s … Continued
Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental Health Awareness Month

May is Mental Health Month, so library staff want to share some relevant resources in psychology and mental wellness.  Online journals provide current, readily accessible articles.  We subscribe to two major databases that cover psychological issues: ProQuest Psychology Journals and PsycINFO from EBSCOhost (see last week’s blog for more on EBSCO).  Both are very user-friendly and have a wealth of full text information.  If currency isn’t an issue, JSTOR can also be a powerful database, but it doesn’t feature articles from the last few years like ProQuest and EBSCO do.  You also might want to use PubMed Central, the National Institute of Health’s free digital archive.   Additionally, we also have a wide selection of books and e-books, a sampling … Continued
Strategies for database searching

Strategies for database searching

Chances are, if you’ve used a library database, you’ve used one of the EBSCO databases.  Some of the databases provided by the vendor EBSCO are available to Indiana residents through Inspire, and Ohio residents through OhioLink. At IU East, a third of our full-text journals are available through the EBSCO interface.  In 2010, IU East students, faculty, and staff searched an EBSCO database 114,240 times, retrieving 102,280 full-text articles. EBSCO provides general search databases like MasterFile and Academic Search Premier.  They also have specialized databases.  For example, if you’re working on a health topic, you could use MedLine, CINAHL, and Health Source.  A criminal justice paper?  PsycInfo and SocIndex will work well for you.  Economics?  Try Business Source Premier.  Education?  … Continued
What We Aim to Accomplish

What We Aim to Accomplish

Probably, at some point in your educational career, you’ve thought about what you’re working towards.  A career?  Fame and fortune?  Stability?  Goals are good. They help us accomplish what we want and need to accomplish.  The Library is committed to the goals IU East has established through the campus Learning Objectives. It makes sense – a library is place where you can into practice what you learn.  Researching.  Experimenting.  Many of our resources are geared around these specific principles of what it is that makes an educated person.  Reading.  Critical examination.  Understanding diverse opinions.  These are all core functions of research. Some of our databases, like Opposing Viewpoints in Context, do this rather dramatically.  Others are more subtle.  But these … Continued