Center for Faculty Development

Teaching Resources

Video Resources

In addition to the tutorials created by CFD staff found in our Kaltura Channel, here are some sources of other video resources.

  • IU Teaching Centers
    A shared repository for media resources for IU instructors created by staff in the various IU teaching centers.
  • Teaching with Technologies Faculty Showcase
    The Teaching with Technology Faculty Showcase is a webinar series in which instructors throughout the IU system present their use of an instructional technology. Instructors elaborate on how they have addressed a teaching goal or challenge using a particular tool or strategy. Each webinar includes a brief introduction to the tool, and how to get started.
  • Fall 2020 Canvas Templates Overview
    A webinar that reviews the use of the Canvas Templates available in courses.

Repositories

Digital repositories are rapidly becoming a key element of course development. Below are links to some resources that might help you plan your next course.

  • MERLOT is a curated collection of free and open online teaching, learning, and faculty development services contributed and used by faculty all over the world. There are thousands of online teaching and learning materials in MERLOT, including peer reviewed open educational resources.
  • Open Education Resources (OER) Commons is a dynamic digital library and network. Explore open education resources and join our network of educators dedicated to curriculum improvement.
  • The Teaching Commons brings together high-quality open educational resources from leading colleges and universities. Curated by librarians and their institutions, the Teaching Commons includes open access textbooks, course materials, lesson plans, multimedia, and more.
  • The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America's libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world.
  • nanoHUB is designed to be a resource to the entire nanotechnology discovery and learning community. STEM focused.
  • MedEd Portal promotes educational scholarship and collaboration by facilitating the open exchange of peer-reviewed health education teaching and assessment resources.

Syllabi

The course syllabus provides an outline for faculty to communicate course expectations, content, and guidelines to students. The Office of Academic Affairs recommends the following information be listed on all syllabi for both online and face to face courses at IU East. This is the minimal information required. Your school may require additional information.

  • Course number and title
  • Total credit hours:
  • Prerequisite courses: list as in bulletin (if applicable)
  • Faculty: name and academic rank of faculty teaching the course
    • Office address (office location and room number)
    • Phone
    • Email
    • Office hours (should also be on file with chairperson and secretaries and posted on office door)
  • Course description:
  • Course learning objectives: (Note: General Education course objectives should be linked to the IU East learning outcomes. This can be indicated in parentheses next to each learning objective (LO1), (LO2), etc.
  • Required materials: (e.g. Textbooks, journals, technology, etc.)
  • Grading:
    • Grade scale
    • Method of deriving grade
  • Course policies: (your specific policies regarding late or missing work, etc., must be explicit in the syllabus)
  • University policies: (List relevant policies as stated in official University documents: e.g. faculty and student handbooks.  When University policies are incorporated, they should be transcribed verbatim from official documents, or you may use the Overview of IU East Grading Policies, which has been vetted by School & Campus Admin.)
  • All syllabi should include the following statements transcribed verbatim (regardless of whether this is online or face to face):
    • Accessibility services:
      Indiana University East strives to make all learning experiences as accessible as possible. If you anticipate or experience academic barriers based on your disability (including mental health, learning, chronic health, physical, hearing, vision or neurological, etc.) Please contact the Office of Accessibility Services immediately at 765-973-8675 or by email at asiue@iue.edu. Note that services are confidential, may take time to put into place and are not retroactive; Captions and alternate media for print materials may take three or more weeks to get produced. The Office of Accessibility Services is located in Springwood Hall, room 202L. Walk-ins are welcome 8 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday.
    • Basic needs security: 
      Any students who face challenges securing their food or housing and believes this may affect their performance in the course should contact the Dean of Students Amy Jarecki (phone number: 765-973-8525) for support. Additionally, IU East employs a student advocate (phone number: 765-973-8395), to help. Furthermore, please notify me if you are comfortable in doing so. This will enable me to provide any resources that I may possess.
    • Title IX and Sexual Misconduct:
      As your instructor, one of my responsibilities is to create a positive learning environment for all students. Title IX and IU’s Sexual Misconduct Policy prohibit sexual misconduct in any form, including sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, and dating and domestic violence.  If you have experienced sexual misconduct, or know someone who has, the University can help. If you are seeking help and would like to speak to someone confidentially, you can make an appointment with the Director of Behavioral Health at 765-973-8646.
      It is also important that you know that Title IX and University policy require me to share any information brought to my attention about potential sexual misconduct, with the campus Deputy Title IX Coordinator or IU’s Title IX Coordinator.  In that event, those individuals will work to ensure that appropriate measures are taken and resources are made available.   Protecting student privacy is of utmost concern, and information will only be shared with those that need to know to ensure the University can respond and assist.  I encourage you to visit stopsexualviolence.iu.edu to learn more.
    • Technology and support:
      You will participate in this course using the IU Canvas platform. Once you are in the platform you can learn how to use Canvas effectively by clicking the “Help” link on the top right of the course page on Canvas. In addition, the IU Knowledge Base is a good resource for any technical questions you may have.
      Technical Difficulties: Contact the IT Help Desk at iueitsup@indiana.edu or by calling 765-973-8375. Most problems can be resolved in less than 24 hours. If there is a system-wide service problem, you will receive email notices regarding the problems and its resolution.
    • Academic support and student services:
      IU East offers a variety of services to assist you in your academic endeavors. This includes everything from advising for your courses to student counseling support. A list of the academic support and student services offered for our students can be found at the Student Success Hub. You can either click on the link or click on the tab named "Student Success Hub" found to your left in Canvas. 
    • Honesty statement:
      Academic honesty is fundamental to the activities and principles of this university.  All members of the academic community must be confident that each person’s work has been responsibly and honorably acquired, developed and presented.  Any effort to gain an advantage not given to all students is dishonest whether or not the effort is successful.  All submitted written work is to be done by the student her/himself.  The academic community regards academic dishonesty as an extremely serious matter, with serious consequences that range from reduction in grade, probation to expulsion.  Using someone else’s work as if it is your own— plagiarism— is a serious university offense and will be dealt with following university guidelines.  You must cite borrowed ideas or text, including lecture material, regardless of whether it is a direct quote or a paraphrasing.  When in doubt— cite. (See section III, Student Misconduct, of the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct, available on the “Campus Course Policies” link, available on the left tab of your courses in Canvas).
    • Overview of IU East Grading Policies:
      The following includes highlights paraphrased from several campus or university policies pertaining to grades and grading. For more information, see the IU East Grading Policies site.
      • Dropping courses:
        • During the first week of classes you may drop a class with no grade recorded on your transcript. From the second week of classes through the ninth week (the ‘auto W’ period), you may withdraw from a class with an automatic grade of ‘W’. This will be recorded on your transcript, but not included in your GPA.
        • After the ninth week (and before the final exam period), a student wishing to withdraw with a grade of ‘W’ must be passing the course at that time. You must complete a ‘Drop Only’ form and contact the offices listed for signatures before giving the form to the instructor. The instructor will confirm on the form that you are passing at that time for a ‘W’ grade or that your grade is an ‘F’. This ‘F’ grade WILL be included in calculation of your GPA.
        • Faculty members are required to report any student who stops attending a class and does not withdraw (with a grade of ‘W’ or ‘F’). Failure of a course due to non-attendance may affect financial aid award amounts.
      • Incomplete: The grade of "I" (Incomplete) may be given to a student whose work in a course is satisfactory except that some terminal aspect of the course requirements have not been completed. The grade of "I" will only be given if the instructor has sufficient reason to believe that failure to complete the requirements of the course was beyond the student's control and that it would be unjust to hold the student to the time limits normally fixed for completion of the required work.
      • Grade appeal: If you believe the grade received in a course is incorrect, you should follow the Grade Appeal Policy.  The initial appeals process states that “[s]tudents who are dissatisfied with the grade received in a course should contact the instructor and attempt to resolve the matter amicably and informally.  If the matter cannot be resolved, the student should consult the IU East Grade Appeal Policy and follow the procedures stated therein.”
  • Course Calendar / Schedule of Assignments
  • Additional suggestions:
    • While not required, Quality Matters suggests other best practices in syllabi development. These include the addition of the following:
      • Ensure syllabus is in an accessible format
      • Include a list of technologies students will need to succeed in the course
      • Include digital literacy skills students will need to succeed in the course
      • Include a list of accessibility and privacy links to all external tools used in the course
      • Include a curriculum map for students to offer transparency about what they will be learning in the course and how they will be learning it.
  • Course content notes (optional):
    • Course content notes (or ‘trigger warnings’) might be appropriate for some of your courses. The following statements offer a starting place for you to think about how you might present controversial or sensitive topics to students in your courses.
      • For face-to-face courses: During our time together, readings or discussions may trigger strong feelings. Discussions can reveal perceptions from our peers that may make us uncomfortable, angry, or offended in some way.  In the interest of open and honest discussion, we should all respect the variety of perspectives that may be expressed in an atmosphere that is both intellectually rigorous and respectful.  However, if you ever feel that you need to step out of a class because of the nature of the conversation or the uncomfortable emotions that it generates, you may do so without academic penalty.  You will be responsible, however, for any missed material.  If there are readings that might be emotionally difficult for you, please bring them to my attention, and we can discuss options that may be available, if possible.
      • For online courses: During our time together, readings or discussions may trigger strong feelings. Online forums and discussions can reveal perceptions from our peers that may make us uncomfortable, angry, or offended in some way.  In the interest of open and honest discussion, we should all respect the variety of perspectives that may be expressed in an atmosphere that is both intellectually rigorous and respectful.  However, if you ever feel that you need to avoid a particular discussion topic or forum because of the nature of the conversation or the uncomfortable emotions that it generates, you may do so without academic penalty.  You will be responsible, however, for any missed material and will need to discuss options with me.  If there are readings that might be emotionally difficult for you, please bring them to my attention, and we can discuss options that may be available, if possible.

Please see the example syllabi, which includes required elements and policy statements and suggestions for developing a learner-centered and comprehensive syllabus.

Teaching Technologies

UITS Learning Technologies partners with faculty to investigate tools and approaches that extend and deepen digital learning environments at IU.

Zoom
Zoom is a web collaboration tool available to all Indiana University students, faculty, and staff. A regular Zoom meeting can support up to 100 simultaneous participants, while a large meeting can support up to 300 participants. Zoom also includes a webinar tool for very large meetings or classes. Zoom provides high-quality audio and video, intuitive sharing and co-annotation tools, breakout rooms, whiteboarding tools, the ability to easily add content to a meeting on the fly, and the option to download meeting recordings as MP4 files. Zoom integrates into Canvas as an external tool, and has apps for all platforms, including fully featured iOS and Android apps. Zoom's high-quality video and recording features also allow for recording simple videos with a webcam.

Box
The IU Box service provides a simple, secure way to share and store files and folders online. Box consolidates your content in a single location, easily accessible from anywhere, on any device. You can create files and folders, share them using a direct link, invite others to collaborate, and continue to revise and review your content. Though similar in appearance to other consumer services such as Dropbox, Box can directly integrate with existing IU systems (e.g., accounts, CAS for single sign-on with your IU username and passphrase), security, and contractual protections. Your Box account quota is unlimited.

Top Hat
Top Hat is a comprehensive teaching platform that instructors can use to engage students both within and outside of the classroom with interactive slides, graded questions, customized content, videos, discussions, and polls. Students use smartphones, tablets, laptops, or ordinary cell phones to participate in Top Hat activities.

Turnitin.com
Turnitin is web-based plagiarism detection software owned by Turnitin.com, Inc. Turnitin can be used as a deterrent, but also as an educational tool to teach students how to work with sources and to improve paraphrasing and quoting skills. The integration of Turnitin into the Assignments tool of Canvas allows students to submit written work to both their instructors and Turnitin at the same time.

Next.IU
Learning technologies are always evolving, and IU is always trying new tools to enhance teaching, learning, and colaboration on IU campuses. Next.iu.edu is a great platform to find the newest tools in education, and to signup, or even suggest pilots for new products.

Feel free to contact the IU East Center for Faculty Development if you would like help getting started with any of these tools, or if you are just looking for something new to add to your courses.

Policies & Procedures

The following information offers description of certain university academic policies. While not all University policies are addressed, we highlight some policies pertaining to both academic and non-academic policies on our campus.

Accessibility, Privacy, and Technology Requirements

Accessibility Statements:

At IU East, student’s accessibility needs are also important to us. Below are links to the accessibility statements for some of the most common tools we use in our courses:

Privacy Statements:

IU East cares about protecting student’s privacy. Below are the privacy policies for some of the most common tools used in our courses:

Technology Requirements:

Students need to be aware of the technology and digital literacy skills they will need for each course. Below is a list of the standard requirements many students will need.

Technical Requirements

  • Computer
  • Reliable internet connection
  • Computer microphone
  • Some way to make and post a simple video (e.g., using a webcam, or a smart phone)
  • Open Canvas in a Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome browser

To participate in an online course, you will need a newer model (Windows or Macintosh) computer, a recent version of at least two web browsers, a 'high-speed' internet connection (does not have to be in the home), and basic computer skills. A student may have to access and/or download large class files. The following is the suggested minimum computer system requirements:

Hardware Requirements for Laptop and Desktop

  • Windows 7 or Macintosh OS X ( (10.7 - Lion) or higher Operating System
  • CPU (Processor) speed of 2.4 GHz or faster
  • 4 gigabyte (GB) RAM (1 dimm recommended)
  • 20 GB available hard disk space (Storage)
  • High speed Internet access (cable, DSL, etc.)
  • Minimum 1 USB 3.0 port recommended

Software Requirements

  • Any Internet Service Provider (ISP)
  • Microsoft Office 2010 or higher* or Office 365
  • Mozilla Firefox 13.0 or higher and/or Google Chrome 
  • Adobe (Acrobat) Reader [http://get.adobe.com/reader/]

* Available on the IUware DVD from the IU East Bookstore ($5), or for free (with IU login) through http://iuware.iu.edu

Guidelines for Mobile Technology

  • Camera: 2.0 M Pixel Camera (or higher)
  • Web conferencing ability (such as Facetime or Skype)
  • Wireless: WLAN 802.11 b/g/n@2.4GHz and/or Bluetooth V3.0 (or higher)
  • CPU (Processor) speed of1 GHz or faster
  • 16 GB available hard disk space (Storage) at minimum
  • Compatible with iPad 2 Apps Recommended

Technical and Digital Literacy Skills

To be successful in this online course, you should be able to perform the following tasks:

  • Use a keyboard and mouse
  • Save, open, edit and locate various file types on your computer (docx, pdf, excel, etc.)
  • Open, create, send, and reply to Blazer email using Inbox in Canvas
  • Attach/Upload and download various files (docx, pdf, excel, etc.)
  • Click on and open hyperlinks
  • Navigate the Internet
  • Navigate the Canvas course environment
  • Download and utilize software and/or plug-ins as specified by your instructor

Technical Support

You will participate in this course using the IU Canvas platform. Once you are in the platform you can learn how to use Canvas effectively, by clicking the “Help” link on the top right of the course page on Canvas.

In addition, the IU Knowledge Base is a good resource for any technical questions you may have.

Technical Difficulties: Contact the IT Help Desk at iueitsup@indiana.edu or by calling 765-973-8375. Most problems can be resolved in less than 24 hours. If there is a system-wide service problem, you will receive email notices regarding the problems and its resolution.

Transparent Teaching

The Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education project (TILT Higher Ed) is an award-winning national educational development and research project that helps faculty to implement a transparent teaching framework that promotes college students' success.

Transparent Teaching is an empirically tested, pedagogical framework designed to foster student success. The premise of transparent teaching is that in helping students better understand the purpose and practices of course content, they will be more engaged and take an active role in their learning.

There are numerous resources available to learn more about this project and how you might incorporate transparent teaching in your own courses. - https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/periodicals/transparency-teaching-faculty-share-data-and-improve-students