IU East, WTA commemorate agreement for online education

August 15th, 2014

Indiana University East and the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) celebrated a successful first-year partnership on Sunday, August 10. The WTA and IU East commemorated the partnership with a plaque in recognition of the exclusive educational agreement for players during the Western & Southern Open tournament at the Lindner Family Tennis Center held just north of Cincinnati, August 9-17.

“We are honored and pleased to continue our partnership with the WTA as the primary provider for baccalaureate online degree completion programs,” IU East Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe said.WTA2014

Women’s Tennis Benefits Association (WTBA) Chair Lisa Grattan said, “There is a buzz among the players about the online educational opportunities now available through IU East. The WTA and players are excited about this partnership.”

Currently, 15 of the world’s top 200 players are enrolled in IU East’s online degree completion programs. WTA players have been enrolled at IU East since the spring 2013 term, including internationally-known tennis star Venus Williams, who is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

IU East online degree programs offer the high quality of an Indiana University degree to students throughout Indiana, nationally and internationally.

IU East offers 10 options for students to complete their bachelor’s degree online in English with an emphasis in Technical and Professional Writing, Mathematics, Natural Science and Mathematics with a Mathematics Concentration, Communication Studies, Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Political Science, Psychology, General Studies, and an RN to BSN Mobility Option. IU East also offers a Graduate Certificate in Composition Studies and a Graduate Certificate in Mathematics.

Founded in 1973, the WTA is the global leader in women’s professional sport with more than 2,500 players representing 92 nations. For more information on the WTA, visit wtatennis.com.

For more information about IU East’s online degree programs, visit iue.edu/online. For information about admission, contact Lori Current at 800-959-3278 extension 208 or email finish@iue.edu. Information is also available online at iue.edu/admissions.

Photo: (Front row, left to right) IU East Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe, Stacey Allister CEO WTA, Lori Current, assistant director of Admissions at IU East, Molly Vanderpool, director of Admissions at IU East. (Back row, left to right) Lisa Gratton, WTBA chair, IU East Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Larry Richards, and Vanessa Webb, WTA Board of Directors and Player Class Director.

 

 

IU East introduces Joe Griffin as new Athletic Director

August 14th, 2014

Joe Griffin has been named the Director of Athletics at Indiana University East, the school announced July 22.Joe Griffin1

“We welcome Joe to Red Wolf Nation,” said IU East Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe. “Joe has a proven track record of success and growth at an NAIA institution. We are pleased to have someone with Joe’s level of expertise in so many areas leading our team at IU East as we continue the growth of our athletics program.”

Griffin comes to IU East from Simpson University, where he served as Athletic Director for the past seven years. Simpson is an NAIA program in Redding, California.

“IU East has had an excellent start in NAIA athletics,” Griffin said. “I want to continue that excellence and grow it even more. I look forward to building on what has been built already.”

Griffin oversaw the addition of six intercollegiate sports teams (four of them NAIA programs) at Simpson in a five-year span. The school increased its number of student-athletes by 100 during Griffin’s tenure, a 71 percent increase.

“Joe did a tremendous job in changing the landscape of our athletic department at Simpson University,” said Derrick Pringle, the assistant athletic director, women’s basketball coach and sports information director at Simpson. “He will be missed dearly, and we as an athletic department are excited for his new position at Indiana University East.”

Don Ott, commissioner of California Pacific Conference of which Simpson is a member, added, “Joe’s impact on the Cal Pac cannot be understated. He is a man of character, a terrific leader, an advocate for student-athletes, and a leader of coaches. I’m glad to also call him a good friend. IU East picked up a great man. We will miss him.”

Griffin was athletic director at Dallas Christian College and Atlanta Christian College (now Point University) prior to his time at Simpson.

Griffin has head coaching experience at the collegiate level in women’s volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, soccer and golf. His 1999-2000 men’s basketball team at Atlanta Christian College won the NCCAA Division II national championship.

Griffin earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Behavioral Science from Cedarville University. He earned a Master of Education in Physical Education with emphasis on Sports Management from Georgia State University.

Griffin already has ties to the Richmond area. Griffin’s wife, Carla, graduated from nearby National Trail High School (Ohio). Griffin was a men’s basketball assistant coach at Earlham College during the 1993-94 school year. He also worked for Preble County Educational Services during that school year.

“We’re looking forward to getting there and getting started,” Griffin said. “We’re excited and looking forward to being part of the Richmond and IU East community.”

Griffin will begin his duties at IU East on Aug. 18.

IU East teams have qualified for seven national tournaments and won nine league championships since joining the NAIA in 2007. IU East has been an NAIA Champions of Character Institution every year since joining the NAIA.

IU East Hispanic Culture Fair is Feb. 22

August 12th, 2014

Indiana University East welcomes the community to join the “Viva! Hispanic Culture Fair” from noon to 3 p.m. on Saturday, February 22, in Hayes Hall. Celebrate Hispanic culture with dance, music, games, arts and crafts, and a variety of interactive learning stations.

The event is free. Children are welcome with an accompanying adult.

IU East students will host this special event, in celebration of Girls Scouts of America “World Thinking Day.”

Pick up your passport and follow Rufus, the Lobo Rojo, as you travel the world. Play Bingo in Mexico (Lotería), see the Nazca geoglyphs in Peru, join a puppet show, make a flag from a Spanish-speaking country, design your own castanets, learn the Flamenco with Dolka, watch international short films, and dance to a live band.

For more information call (765) 973-8470 or email iueastsl@iue.edu.

IU East’s Danielson Learning Center Celebrates 15th Anniversary: Alumni share their experiences at the Henry County campus

August 6th, 2014

Indiana University East is celebrating the 15th anniversary of the Danielson Learning Center with an open house from 4-7 p.m. on Thursday, August 7. The Danielson Center is located at 300 Trojan Lane in New Castle, Ind.

The open house will celebrate the center’s accomplishments and reaffirm IU East’s dedication to provide services and promote postsecondary education in Henry County. The mission of the Danielson Center is to help improve the county’s economic viability and quality of life by coordinating and expanding local resources.

IU East alumni Brock Davis, Trevor Jones, Kenneth A. Ritchie II and Michelle White share their stories on how the Danielson Center helped them to achieve their academic and professional goals close to home.

Brock Davis, ’14, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Davis, received his degree in business administration while he worked full-time at Ameriana Bank and is now the vice president of Retail Operations. He said he learned from instructors who worked in the area they were teaching, making his educational experience more like real life experience.BrockDavis

“As a working student I wanted to learn from experienced professionals and not just a textbook,” Davis said.

Trevor Jones, ’08, Bachelor of Social Work
Since high school, Jones knew he wanted to help others. At the time, he was a junior volunteering for a peer facilitating program that mentored elementary school students.TrevorJones

“That is when I discovered the calling to make a difference and impact others in a positive way,” Jones said.

The New Castle native chose to attend Indiana University East following his high school graduation. In particular, he decided to take his courses at the Danielson Learning Center because of its convenient location close to home. His mother, Sandra Jones, is also an IU East graduate and attended classes at the Danielson Center. She earned her Bachelor of Social Work degree in 2001.

Jones said that the experience he had while a student at the Danielson Center is one that made an impact.

“Every semester was a surprise. Each one brought new challenges. I got to discover how strong of a person I was,” Jones said. “I was able to grow into my own skin and learn how to see the bigger picture in everyday life situations.”

Kenneth A. Ritchie II, ’09, Bachelor of Science in Biology
Ritchie, was an undergraduate with a full-time schedule in and out of the classroom. During the day, he worked full-time at Henry County Hospital as a radiology technologist. Following his shift, he would drive three miles across New Castle to the Danielson Learning Center for evening classes in order to complete his biology degree.KenRitchie

Today, Ritchie is in his third year of the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program at Butler University. He will graduate with his master’s degree in May 2015. As a physician assistant, Ritchie will be able to provide medical services, care and treatment to patients.

“I worked as a radiology technologist specializing in CT and MRI for many different years and decided that I wanted to be more involved in the patient’s care and treatment,” Ritchie said.

Once Ritchie completes his master’s degree, he plans to work in New Castle.

Michelle White, ’06, Bachelor of Art in Fine Arts
The Danielson Learning Center made a difference in White’s life. White enrolled at the New Castle campus six years after graduating high school. She had grown up in Henry County, 15 miles from the center. As a single mother, in addition to working two jobs, the local campus was the most conducive option for her to pursue a bachelor’s degree.MichelleWhite

“The Danielson Center offers small class sizes, and a closer atmosphere than a large campus. The classes are small enough that the professors know their students by name, and easily recognize if there are areas where the student struggles.  The classes were small and engaging, and professors were able to spend more individual time with their students,” White said.

Once White graduated with her B.S. in Fine Arts and a Minor in Creative Writing, she went on to earn her M.B.A. from Indiana Wesleyan University. She taught business courses at the Danielson Center in the evenings, including a marketing class and a computer class. She worked as a treasurer for Charles A Beard Memorial School Corporation for 14 years and she was  elected to the district’s School Board of Trustees in 2012.

“All through high school, I was business oriented.  I always knew I would work in business, probably in an office somewhere.  Though I eventually went back for my M.B.A., I spent my undergrad years exploring a completely new side of myself that I didn’t even know existed,” White said. “I can’t imagine how different my life may have been had I not made that decision to go back to school at the Danielson Learning Center in New Castle.”

About the Danielson Learning Center
The Danielson Learning Center promotes post secondary education in Henry County to improve its economic viability and quality of life by coordinating and expanding local resources. The Danielson Center, located at 300 Trojan Lane in New Castle, is one of Indiana University East’s off-campus locations.

The Danielson Learning Center was founded by a group of Henry County residents who realized the need for higher education within the county. This group has since formed as the Danielson Education Council, Inc. The vision is to provide all Henry County residents access to opportunities that will enable them to reach their post secondary educational potential.

IU East’s Danielson Learning Center Celebrates 15th Anniversary Aug. 7

August 6th, 2014

Indiana University East is celebrating the 15th anniversary of the Danielson Learning Center with an open house from 4-7 p.m. on Thursday, August 7. The Danielson Center is located at 300 Trojan Lane in New Castle, Ind. The center opened in 1999.DanielsonCenter2014

The open house will celebrate the center’s accomplishments and reaffirm IU East’s dedication to provide services and promote post secondary education in Henry County. The mission of the Danielson Center is to help improve the county’s economic viability and quality of life by coordinating and expanding local resources.

Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe said, “The partnership between IU East and the Danielson Center is a wonderful example of the dedication Henry County has to higher education and the vitality of its community. The community came together 15 years ago to see this venture come to fruition and today we celebrate the accomplishments of the center, its friends, current students and alumni.”

During the celebration, Danny Danielson will deliver remarks at 5:30 p.m. on the history of the Danielson Center. Chancellor Cruz-Uribe will present on the center’s future.

Visitors may tour the building and receive information on the baccalaureate degree programs offered by IU East in New Castle, including General Studies, Business Administration, and the RN to BSN. The center also offers non-credit courses for personal enrichment through continuing education opportunities.

The Henry County Foundation will contribute $5 toward scholarships for each visitor who completes a tour.

The Danielson Center was made possible after a group of residents, now formed as the Danielson Education Council, Inc., saw the need for higher education housed within their community. Danny and Patty Danielson challenged the community to raise money to build the center and the campaign raised $1 million for construction of the center. The first courses were held in fall 1999. There were 159 students enrolled for course work.

Through collaboration, IU East helps to maintain and broaden the scope and quality of Henry County’s employment opportunities and improve the quality of life in the region.

Alumni Spotlight: Trevor Jones

August 6th, 2014

TrevorJonesSince high school, Trevor Jones, ’08, knew he wanted to help others. At the time, he was a junior volunteering a peer facilitating program that mentored elementary school students.

“That is when I discovered the calling to make a difference and impact others in a positive way,” Jones said.

The New Castle native chose to attend Indiana University East following his high school graduation. In particular, he decided to take his courses at the Danielson Learning Center because of its convenient location close to home.

“I was able to basically take all of my elective and general classes there without going to the main campus. I was able to schedule classes around my work schedule,” Jones said. “I loved my Monday all day social work classes. Basically ate all three meals there while taking classes. You really got to build a relationship with the other classmates in the social work program.”

Two faculty members that really had an effect on Jones were Shelia Armstead and Ed Fitzgerald. Jones said both Armstead and Fitzgerald encouraged their students “to think outside of the box and take the limits off of situations.”

In 2008, Jones graduated with his Bachelor of Social Work degree. He is now a state certified state case manager and works from his hometown as a case manager for the Indiana Professional Management Group. As a case manager, Jones is responsible for managing individuals on the Medicaid Wavier program. He ensures that program participants receive services including residential placements, therapy and treatment.

In addition to his full-time job, Jones is vice president of the IU East Alumni Association Board. He first joined the board as a new graduate in 2008.  He participates in several of the events hosted by the board including Red Wolf dinners, connecting alumni with current students, IU East Alumni Night at New Boswell Brewery, and IU East’s Commencement Ceremony. Jones said being present to hand the graduates their diplomas is a good memory for him because he sees to see excitement of the graduating class, and their excitement to start their career, is priceless.

Jones said that the experience he had while a student at the Danielson Center, is one that has continued to influence his life today.

“Every semester was a surprise. Each one brought new challenges. I got to discover how strong of a person I was,” Jones said. “I was able to grow into my own skin and learn how to see the bigger picture in everyday life situations.”

Alumni Spotlight: Michelle White

August 6th, 2014

The Danielson Learning Center made a difference in Michelle White’s life.  The 2006 alumna enrolled at the New Castle campus six years after graduating high school. She had grown up in Henry County, 15 miles from the center. As a single mother of one, in addition to working two jobs, the local campus was the most conducive option for her to pursue a bachelor’s degree.MichelleWhite

“The Danielson Center offers small class sizes, and a closer atmosphere than a large campus.  The classes are small enough that the professors know their students by name, and easily recognize if there are areas where the student struggles.  The classes were small and engaging, and professors were able to spend more individual time with their students,” White said.

White was nervous to step back in the classroom as a non-traditional student. With the help of staff to enroll and register, returning to the classroom was seamless.

“The staff was extremely helpful, and walked me through each step.  Throughout my undergraduate degree, I was surprised at how easy it was to get my degree as long as I was willing to put in the work.  The staff and teachers at New Castle Danielson Center made my experience enjoyable,” White said.

During the time that White attended courses at the center, she changed her major from a Bachelor of Science in English to a Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts with a focus on painting, mostly at the influence of her mentor and art instructor, Simon Clopper.

She had decided to enroll in an all-day art course at the center taught by Clopper.

“I remember crying all the way home on the first day, and even considered dropping the class.  He was very specific about what we were painting and what we were going to learn,” White said.

But White continued with the course despite feeling apprehensive the first few days. In fact, after that first semester with Clopper, she signed up for every course he taught at the Danielson Center. She added that one of the biggest lessons she learned about herself while in college, is that she had a passion for art.

“I truly found a love for painting in Simon’s class that I may have missed if it weren’t for his way of teaching. He was the reason I changed my focus from English to Art, and I have never regretted the change,” White said. “I was also lucky enough to meet one of my best friends in his class.  Her and I still paint today, and still meet with Simon on occasion to catch up over dinner.  He was a changing person in my life, and I will always be grateful to him.”

As a student, White helped establish an Art Club and served as co-president. She was also co-president of the Student Council. Both clubs worked to raise money each year through the Haunted Barn in Memorial Park.  The Art Club organized the first Festival of Artists and the first Battle of the Bands event at the Henry County Art Park, White said.

“Throughout the years, our clubs were able to raise money, collect canned foods for the local shelters, and collect coats for local children’s organizations,” White said.

In 2006, White received the IU East Outstanding Organizational Leader/President Award.

Once White graduated with her B.S. in Fine Arts and a Minor in Creative Writing, she went on to earn her M.B.A. from Indiana Wesleyan University. She taught business courses at the Danielson Center in the evenings, including a marketing class and a computer course which is a required class for all majors to learn the basics of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, File Management, and Access. She worked as a treasurer for Charles A. Beard Memorial School Corporation, at the high school and for the corporation, over 14 years. White was also elected to the district’s School Board of Trustees in 2012.

“All through high school, I was business oriented.  I always knew I would work in business, probably in an office somewhere.  Though I eventually went back for my M.B.A., I spent my undergrad years exploring a completely new side of myself that I didn’t even know existed,” White said. “I can’t imagine how different my life may have been had I not made that decision to go back to school at the Danielson Learning Center in New Castle.”

Alumni Spotlight: Kenneth A. Ritchie II

August 6th, 2014

Kenneth A. Ritchie II, ’09, was an undergraduate with a full-time schedule in and out of the classroom. During the day, he worked full-time at the Henry County Hospital as a radiology technologist. Following his shift, he would drive three miles across New Castle to the Danielson Learning Center for evening classes in order to complete a Bachelor of Science in Biology degree.KenRitchie

As a direct graduate from high school, the New Castle native completed a two-year program at Reid Hospital & Health Care Services to become a certified radiologic technologist. He went to work at the Henry County Hospital and has worked there for 12 years.

“The close proximity allowed me to get to classes in the evening after work. I was able to take a majority of my prerequisite and elective courses locally instead of having to travel to Richmond,” Ritchie said.

While at the center, Ritchie met and worked with Kim Greer, who at the time was an assistant professor of biology at IU East. He said with Greer as the instructor for most of his biology courses, it allowed him to maintain his work schedule while completing many of his required courses through independent study.

“I learned a lot patience, as my four-year degree plan began to morph into a eight-year degree plan. I also learned how to balance family, work, and classes being a non-traditional student,” Ritchie said.
The hard work paid off.

He was the recipient of the 2010 Naomi Osborne Award, an honor given to the graduate with the highest grade point average, and led the graduating class during the alumni induction ceremony. (As a December 2009 graduate, he is part of the 2010 graduating class.) He was also named as a 2010 Chancellor’s Scholar Award recipient for the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The award is presented to the highest achieving senior, by academic school.

Ritchie also met and proposed to his wife, Elizabeth (Bales) Ritchie, at the Danielson Learning Center.

Today, Ritchie is in his third year of the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program at Butler University. He will graduate with his master’s degree in May 2015. As a physician assistant, Ritchie will be able to provide medical services, care and treatment to patients.

“I worked as a radiology technologist specializing in CT and MRI for many different years and decided that I wanted to be more involved in the patient’s care and treatment,” Ritchie said.

Through the program, he has completed six-week rotations with doctors located in Henry County including in general surgery, orthopedics, emergency medicine, family medicine and internal medicine.
Once Ritchie completes his master’s degree, he plans to work in New Castle.

Alumni Spotlight: Brock Davis

August 6th, 2014

BrockDavisAs a non-traditional student taking courses at Indiana University East’s Danielson Learning Center, Brock Davis of New Castle, Ind., learned patience and perseverance.

At the time, the father of two was working full time at Ameriana Bank, located just next door to the Danielson Center. He said the classes and the material he studied made an immediate impact and he could use it in his day-to-day work.

“IU East offered many courses either at the Danielson Center or online to accommodate my work schedule,” Davis said. “I learned from professionals working in the area they were teaching. It made learning closer to real life experience, and as a working student I wanted to learn from experienced professionals and not just a textbook.”

There were many lessons Davis learned as a student, but most importantly, by completing his degree he fulfilled a promise he made to his family and late mother to earn his degree.

Now the vice president of Retail Operations at Ameriana Bank, Davis implements procedures for accuracy and efficiency. He is responsible for developing analytical reporting representing trends or abnormalities in consumer behavior. Additionally, he manages the training and development department regarding procedures and Ameriana culture, he said. Davis started his career at Ameriana Bank in 2002.

Davis also volunteers as a board member for Kids R Golden, and organization that helps Henry County families facing pediatric cancer diagnosis by providing urgent relief funds and other support while raising awareness in the community for children and families battling cancer.

“It’s a great opportunity to work for a community bank located in New Castle, Indiana and gain the experience and skills many only develop through the ‘big banks’,” Davis said. “I have been given opportunities to advance my career over the years with Ameriana and feel very blessed.”

In the future, Davis plans to enroll in the Master of Science in Management program at IU East.

Richmond receives National Endowment for the Arts funding for cultural trail

July 29th, 2014

The city of Richmond, Richmond Art Museum and Indiana University East have received an Our Town grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Richmond is one of two cities in the state of Indiana to receive an Our Town grant this year; Indianapolis also received a grant. NEAgrant

The $50,000 grant will help fund the $211,000 two-year project that will be used to strengthen the community through the arts by establishing a cultural trail throughout Wayne County, home to some of the oldest cultural institutions in Indiana. The cultural trail, a creative asset mapping project, will focus on the county’s deep arts and cultural heritage. Additional cash and in-kind support for the grant has been provided by program partners and collaborators including Reid Hospital & Health Care Services, Wayne County Foundation, Wayne County Convention and Tourism Bureau and the Economic Development Corporation.

The cultural trail will include opportunities for the public to provide its input and ideas. The finalized plan will be presented to the Richmond Common Council.

Richmond Mayor Sally Hutton said, “It’s exciting and quite an honor to be selected for an Our Town grant award. This opportunity will allow us to make significant progress in our efforts to strengthen our community through the arts. Our vision is that these cultural planning efforts will result in a stronger sense of place, pride in the community and improved economic vitality.”

Shaun Dingwerth, executive director of the Richmond Art Museum, said, “The Richmond Art Museum is pleased to be a part of this prestigious grant opportunity. Wayne County has a rich artistic legacy recognized nationally as the art center of the West. Our community can once again be a cultural destination as we continue to partner to bring quality arts to Wayne County. We are grateful to the NEA for recognizing our community efforts and their confidence in our ability to enhance the quality of life of for all Wayne  County citizens.”

IU East Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe recognizes the university’s tie to the community and its deep commitment to the economic and cultural development of the region, in particular serving as a “Steward of Place.”

“IU East is delighted to partner with the city of Richmond and the Richmond Art Museum to help plan and develop a Wayne County cultural trail, connecting the community through discussion, activity and involvement,” Cruz-Uribe said.

Fredricka Joyner, associate professor of business administration and organization behavior, will help to coordinate the grant and serve as the project director.

“This project will expand on several years of collaborative work undertaken by many organizations in the community. We are particularly excited about the opportunity this project presents for IU East to be actively involved in strengthening residents’ feeling of attachment to the community,” Joyner said. “Funding from the National Endowment for the Arts is difficult to obtain and represents a huge vote of confidence for the work that is taking place in Richmond.”

The cultural trail grew from four years of the community’s work through the city, the Mayor’s Council on Economic Vitality and the Positive Place Initiative (PPI).  Additionally, Richmond was designated by the state of Indiana as a “Stellar Community,” providing the city with eligibility for federal and state funding to complete projects in excess of $20 million that will help to continue and accelerate the revitalization and redevelopment of the downtown area, one of the potential key intersections for the cultural trail.

The NEA announced July 16 that it had awarded 66 grants to communities across 38 states. The NEA is funding $5.073 million in projects through the grant program. This year, there were 275 applications submitted to the funding program.

According to the NEA, this year’s Our Town projects demonstrate again that excellent art is as fundamental to a community’s success as land-use, transportation, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety, helping build stronger communities that are diverse in geography and character. Our Town funds arts-based community development projects in a way that is authentic, equitable, and augments existing local assets.