student writing

student writing

Student Research Day – a celebration of scholarship and creativity

Student Research Day – a celebration of scholarship and creativity

All IU East students, in every discipline, are invited to participate in Student Research Day, where we recognize the research, scholarly and creative work of our student scholars.  Whether it’s writing a play, designing an experiment, discovering a fresh take on history or developing the next big idea, you have an opportunity to share that work with the entire IU East community on Friday, April 10, at Student Research Day. Online students as well as on-campus students can submit a proposal.  Student work that results from independent scholarship from courses, independent studies, summer research programs, Honor’s projects, and creative endeavors will be all featured. Participants may choose to present a poster or an oral presentation, to be judged by a … Continued
Red Wolves Write!

Red Wolves Write!

To celebrate student writing in all its forms across the curriculum, IU East hosted its second annual Student Writing Day, on April 10, 2019. With posters, presentations, infographics and more, students from English, criminal justice, nursing and other fields presented the best of their written work. Coordinated by English Assistant Professor and Writing Program Director Travis Rountree, Student Writing Day also included activities and advice.  The Writing Center was staffed and ready with schedules and knowledgeable students.  The IU East Campus Library staff offered literary games, which included ekphrastic poetry exercises and a narrative drawing game involving prompts and ingenuity.  A total of 12 poems and 21 drawings were produced, with insights on cats, books, bubbles and butterflies. Students from … Continued
It’s National Poetry Month? Nonsense!

It’s National Poetry Month? Nonsense!

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves,      And the mome raths outgrabe. “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll   While many of us associate poetry with big words, flowery images and rhyme, there has always been a nonsense streak as well. The above poem, possibly Lewis Carroll’s most famous poem, is one of the best known examples of nonsense poetry. Yet nonsense poems, and Carroll’s in particular, often carry significant political undertones. For example, in Carroll’s “The Hunting of the Snark”, he tackles vivisection and the role of anthrocentrist activities in scientific pursuit. Jabberwocky itself may be a commentary on the notion of “meaning” – that is, according to … Continued